Textile art ideas for a biophilic design

in Biophilic Design

Generally speaking, art is an amazing tool to add character to a space.
Textile artworks also add a layer of texture and – when sufficiently big – can even contribute to the thermal insulation of a room.
Textile art can also turn out to be a cost-effective alternative, as tapestries are often less expensive than an equally big canvas.
Last but not least, textile art has been rising in popularity lately. Pinterest has even included it in the top trends for the new year, with users’ searches for textile art increasing by a remarkable +1718% (opened in a new window/tab)

Tying together the rise of textile art as interior trend 2019 and the use of art in biophilic design, I’ve searched for examples of biophilic-inspired textile art.
Let's take a look!

Upcycling & textile art

Keeping an eye on sustainability, Lisa Kokin (opened in a new window/tab) uses recycled materials like buttons, photos and books to create her textile art.
One of my favourite is this gorgeous branch of textile leaves. Each leaf encloses a fragment of a book. It is Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, that I’ve learned has been one of the first popular books about the polluting effects of pesticides.

Textile art in the shape of a branch made of yarn leaves and close-up of a leaf showing the book fragment encased.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Lisa Kokin (opened in a new window/tab) (Photo by Lia Roozendaal Photography)

Louise Saxton (opened in a new window/tab)’s work is also an example of sustainable textile art. She uses – or better said reuses – pieces of needlework, pins and tulle and assembles them to create gorgeous tree or animal shapes!

Textile art tree made up of reused pieces of needlework, pins and tulle.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Textile art parrot made up of reused pieces of needlework, pins and tulle.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credits: Louise Saxton (opened in a new window/tab)

Talking about a sustainable approach to art, I've found a useful infographic that summarizes different ways of creating environmentally-mindful art.

Sustainable art infographic.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Invaluable (opened in a new window/tab)

Fractal textile art

Meredith Woolnough (opened in a new window/tab) embroiders 2D shapes of shells, corals, leaves and flowers.
Her pieces create intricate patterns that recall the complexity of natural fractal shapes.

Overview of different embroidered works reproducing biophilic patterns - colorful pieces.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Close-up of some of the embroidered works showing the patterns.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Overview of different embroidered works reproducing biophilic patterns - black and white pieces.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credits: Meredith Woolnough (opened in a new window/tab)

Natural textures & textile art

What about reproducing stones with textile art?
These rugs are made assembling felt & wool stones, and they look incredibly realistic!

Felt stone rug.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Feltnyarn via Etsy (opened in a new window/tab)
Close-up of a felt stone rug.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Bakrina via Etsy (opened in a new window/tab)

From stones to the ocean. The work of Vanessa Barragão (opened in a new window/tab) is inspired by coral reefs. Alternating crochet sea-creatures, fringes and hand-tufted areas, the end product is full of different textures and reproduces the real scene with incredible detail!

Textile art reproducing coral reefs - perfect for a biophilic design.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Detail of the coral reef textile art.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Detail of the coral reef textile art.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Detail of the coral reef textile art.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credits: Vanessa Barragão (opened in a new window/tab)

 
Overall, textile art is yet another way to recall natural shapes and textures in a biophilic design, reconnecting people with the natural world.

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