sustainable roundups: 10 vases for people and the planet

in sustainable roundups

Vases are among the most common decorative pieces for interiors; they make a statement and add personality to the space.

From a sustainability perspective, vessels are a preferred way to experiment with new materials and techniques. So let’s round up 10 interesting examples sourced from riivin (opened in a new window/tab), the sustainable interior design platform I curate.

production leftovers

Every production process leaves something behind, be it in the form of offcuts or other leftovers. The mistake is automatically considering these leftovers as waste, as they can likely be reinvented as something beautiful and valuable.

Product selection:

Stem vase made with recycled materials.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Zooi (opened in a new window/tab)
Vase made with 3D printed sawdust.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Forust (opened in a new window/tab)
Vase made with recycled clay.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Noot & Swart (opened in a new window/tab)

other recycled input

From packaging and single-use items to trashed stuff, our world generates a lot of waste. But if an object has reached the end of its lifecycle, the same isn’t necessarily true for the materials it is made of.
The vases below prove it, closing the loop by using recycled plastic, glass, paper, and cardboard.

Product selection:

Vase made of recycled plastic.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: KUNST-S (opened in a new window/tab)
Vase made with recycled glass bottles.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Changing Atmosphere (opened in a new window/tab)
Vases made with recycled glass.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: LSA International (opened in a new window/tab)
Vases made with recycled paper.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Mâché (opened in a new window/tab)
Vases made with recycled cardboard.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Tacchini (opened in a new window/tab)

innovative solutions

Sustainable design also means material research. Oftentimes, new materials come from testing the technical qualities of unexpected inputs. Like the ones below, which all start with an unsuspected form of organic waste…

Product selection:

Vase made with dried fruits shells.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Keep Life (opened in a new window/tab)
Vase made with surplus milk.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Tess Silva (opened in a new window/tab)

roundup

Sustainable vases roundup.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>

1 Canopy - by LSA International (opened in a new window/tab)
2 Vine - by Forust (opened in a new window/tab)
3 High Round Lid - by Noot & Swart (opened in a new window/tab)
4 Round - by KUNST-S (opened in a new window/tab)
5 Anthea - by Changing Atmosphere (opened in a new window/tab)
6 Maud - by Zooi (opened in a new window/tab)
7 Calcaire - by Mâché (opened in a new window/tab)
8 Chub - by Tessa Silva (opened in a new window/tab)
9 .104 - by Keep Life (opened in a new window/tab)
10 Mantiqueira - by Tacchini (opened in a new window/tab)

 
Head over to riivin (opened in a new window/tab) for more sustainable interior design inspiration!

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Comments

Don't be shy, let me know what you think!

On Irma shah said:
very informative and useful article.
>
On Silvia - DforDesign said:
Many thanks Irma, so glad you discovered something new! :)
>

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