Invisible, it’s how open-plan kitchens will become

in Design Trends

How will the kitchen of the future look like? It will be invisible!

The overall tendency for the future goes towards smaller living spaces, with the challenge of making them more and more flexible and multifunction. The answer from open-plan kitchens is extreme: a totally invisible kitchen. When not in use, all the elements that make a kitchen disappear, leaving a completely integrated space where kitchen and living blend perfectly.

But how to create an invisible kitchen? Let's go in order...

Fridge

One of the most invasive kitchen appliances is certainly the fridge. Not anymore.

In an invisible kitchen it can get integrated in a built-in to blend with the surroundings. Would you have said one of the doors below is actually a fridge?

The fridge of an invisible kitchen: totally hidden in a built-in.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span> The fridge of an invisible kitchen looks like a fridge just when it's open.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: DforDesign. Fridge: Bosch (opened in a new window/tab)

Faucet

In an open-plan kitchen, another visually disturbing element can be the faucet. But now, there exist innovative push/pull faucets, that can be lowered when not in use.

Invisible faucet, that lowers when not in use leaving a totally invisible kitchen.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Fima (opened in a new window/tab)
When lowered, the faucet stays flush with the sink, for an invisible look.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: DforDesign

To achieve a totally hidden kitchen, the whole sink cavity can be closed as well. From manually sliding a cover over it...

Sliding a cover manually over the kitchen sink to make it invisible.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Magnet (opened in a new window/tab)

...to using gestures that trigger the sink base to automatically move up and down.

Gesture-controlled kitchen sink, that lowers automatically leaving an invisible kitchen.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Offmat (opened in a new window/tab)

Both methods leave with a larger usable surface that makes the space really flexible and multifunctional.

Hood

Hoods are another definitely chunky item in a kitchen. But, in the kitchen of the future, the hood sits flush with the worktop and can be raised with a motorized system only when needed, doubling as backsplash and task light.

Hideaway hood, the perfect choice for an invisible open kitchen.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span> Hideaway hood, view when closed.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Miele (opened in a new window/tab)

An alternative are hoods that don’t even need to be raised (my favourite!) Their suction power is quite amazing and can trap cooking smokes directly from the pan.

A hood that does not need to be raised. The ultimate solution for invisible open kitchens. Example 1.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Bora (opened in a new window/tab)
A hood that does not need to be raised. The ultimate solution for invisible open kitchens. Example 2.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Elica (opened in a new window/tab)

Cabinets

How to make cabinets disappear? What if they became a design feature (opened in a new window/tab)!

It’s the case of these wooden cubes that – extending in a wall niche – create hidden storage while dressing the wall as an art piece.

And voilà, an invisible kitchen becomes decorative at the same time!

Invisible kitchen cabinets become a design feature.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span> Close up of the invisible kitchen cabinets.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: DforDesign

Seamless surfaces

In the design of a hidden kitchen, the whole concept of worktop surface deserves a separate point, as it goes a long way towards integrating kitchen and living spaces in a totally seamless fashion.

Worktop space, cooking area, dining table, desk…all functions can happen on the very same surface! Induction technology is what makes it possible, with induction areas hidden under the worktop level that make the actual hob totally invisible.

Seamless kitchen countertop, integrating a hidden induction hob.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Binova (opened in a new window/tab)

A word on safety: as induction causes the pan to heat while burners stay cool, the worktop can securely be used as dining table or desk when the cooking is done.

And here you have it: open plan kitchen, dining room, home office (and even retreat for your cat!) all in one place.

In an invisible kitchen with hidden induction, pans, papers and even a cat can sit on the same surface at the same time!<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: TPB (opened in a new window/tab)

Extra small spaces

Open-plan kitchens are in general a great solution when the available space is very limited. And there are also some extra-small-scale options to achieve an invisible kitchen.

At the latest Milan Design Week, the Japanese Sanwa Company has presented this fully equipped mini-kitchen.

Extra small invisible kitchen, perfect to create an open plan design in small spaces.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit:DforDesign. Kitchen: Sanwa Company (opened in a new window/tab)

When not in use, the faucet can be folded down. Then the whole surface is closed with a cover and all is left is a desk, that can be even adjusted in height.

Close up of the faucet when folded down.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span> When closed, this extra small kitchen becomes totally invisible.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: DforDesign. Kitchen: Sanwa Company (opened in a new window/tab)

Talking about the kitchen of the future, another factor that is going to bring a complete revolution is technology, but that's another topic that deserves a separate post...
Discover the latest smart kitchen news

Silvia's signature

Share this post

Comments

Don't be shy, let me know what you think!

On SANDFORD FURMAN ARCHITECT said:
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR A COMBINATION INDUCTION COOKTOP WITH A
DOWN DRAFT FAN THAT WILL FIT INTO A SPACE 36" WIDE BY 22 1/2 DEEP?

Newsletter

Join 100+ biophilic and sustainable design enthusiasts on the monthly newsletter.
I'll never share your email with third parties and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Powered by Mailchimp.

Let's Connect on Instagram !

Sustainable Product Picks
Scroll