Biophilic design inspiration with Pantone Classic Blue

in Design Trends

For its Colour of the Year 2020, Pantone has chosen Classic Blue (opened in a new window/tab): a deep and versatile shade that works well all around the home.
So today, we’re going to look at some ways to use it in a biophilic interior…room by room.

An introduction to Classic Blue

Blue landscape with two people holding their hands.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Pantone (opened in a new window/tab)

“Suggestive of the sky at dusk, the reassuring qualities of the thought-provoking PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue highlight our desire for a dependable and stable foundation on which to build as we cross the threshold into a new era.
Imprinted in our psyches as a restful color, PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue brings a sense of peace and tranquility to the human spirit, offering refuge. Aiding concentration and bringing laser like clarity, PANTONE 19-4052 Classic Blue re-centers our thoughts. A reflective blue tone, Classic Blue fosters resilience.”
Cit Pantone

 
In colour psychology, blue is a colour that helps rational thinking and stimulates self-expression while instilling a sense of responsibility.
Like every colour, it also has its negatives (like its association to cold and sadness), but it still remains a very popular hue.

I won’t go into whether such a "safe" colour has been too much of a conservative choice (opened in a new window/tab) for the beginning of this important decade.

What's for sure is that it is a timeless shade of blue, that won’t feel dated next year. So let’s dive into some good examples of biophilic interiors with Classic Blue!

Biophilic Design & Classic Blue

Being quite a deep shade, Classic Blue pairs well with many other colours. This versatility makes it good both as an accent over a more muted base and – for the bravest – as a base colour itself.

Living area

Classic Blue is a great colour choice for a sofa. Natural wood textures complement it beautifully, regardless the colour. When paired with light or greyish wood tones, it shines as an accent. With walnut-like wood tones, it creates an interesting contrast.
Last but certainly not least, it matches great with black, white, and all greys in between.

Close-up of a blue sofa and a bunch of flowers over a light wood coffee table.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Muuto (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)
Living area with blue sofas, dark wood floor and full-height windows with invisible profiles.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Paola Lenti (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)
Living area with grey, white and black palette and one accent blue armchair.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Globewest (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)
Living area with blue and wood walls, plenty of natural light and plants.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: YLAB Arquitectos (via Archilovers) (opened in a new window/tab)

Dining area

In the dining room, Classic Blue can be used as an accent or spread on a full wall. If the available space is small, landscape murals can help enlarge the room visually while adding a nature-inspired element. And to introduce a real natural element, Classic Blue creates a vibrant backdrop for a fireplace!

Dining room flooded with natural light, with light wood floors and walls and blue accent dining chairs.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Bolia (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)
Dining room with light wood furniture and a blue mural showing a foggy forest.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Happy Wall (opened in a new window/tab)
Dining room with blue wall, rustic wood table and big fireplace.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Louwerse De Jong (opened in a new window/tab)

Kitchen

Blue kitchen cabinets are certainly a statement that can be enriched with natural elements for a more biophilic result. For instance, a light stone backsplash and streamlined wood shelves would be perfect in a contemporary design. Instead, a wood floor with marked grain would add more of a rustic touch, that could be further emphasized with unpolished wood cutting boards and terracotta accessories.

Kitchen with blue cabinets and a contrasting clear stone backsplash.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Mcmahon and Nerlich, (via The Local Project) - Photo by Shannon McGrath (opened in a new window/tab)
Kitchen with blue cabinets, and rustic wood cutting boards and flowers as decor.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Alison Giese Interiors (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)

Bedroom

For its relaxing properties, blue is the colour for the bedroom. Like in every other room, greenery is always a good complement to it, as well as a juxtaposition of natural textures.

Bedroom with bed placed against a tall window.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Cultiver (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)
Bedroom with blue watercolour mural on the back wall.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Blue Decor Murals (via Etsy) (opened in a new window/tab)

Bathroom

Stone (or stone-like) surfaces are a good choice to introduce a natural texture in the bathroom while keeping all finishes practical and water-resistant.
Natural shapes can also be reproduced with bathroom-appropriate wallpapers or – why not – with mosaic tiles!

Total white bathroom with blue mosaic wall finish representing birds and branches.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Goszcz Design (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)
Bathroom with blue wall, grey stone lavabo and greenery.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Kate Walker Design (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)

Biophilic Details

And to finish off, here are some more biophilic details that have caught my attention. From leaf shapes and water textures to fractal patterns, there are plenty of possibilities to introduce a touch of Classic Blue in a biophilic interior!

Blue wallpaper representing different types of leaves.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Mademoiselle Camille (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)
Close-up of lilac flowers in blue vases.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Stelton (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)
Artwork representing the texture of water on a white wall surrounded by minimal furnishings.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Desenio (opened in a new window/tab)
Blue wardrobe doors with fractal texture.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: IKEA (opened in a new window/tab)
Eucalyptus branches in a blue vase.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Stelton (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)
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