Biophilic design: flower and greenery arrangements for summer

in Biophilic Design

What does summer mean to nature? And how can we bring that meaning inside our living spaces?

In this series, we’re looking at flower and greenery arrangements from a biophilic design perspective, discovering their value beyond decoration and exploring their role in connecting people to their natural surroundings.

After fall, winter, and spring, it’s now time to look into summer!

Colours

If spring is associated with bright hues, a summer palette is less intense, as colours look faded when hit by strong sunlight.
In summer, some greens look glowing and lush while others get paler. And – according to the climate – summer can also mean dry landscapes.

A biophilic arrangement will take inspiration from what summer means for the immediate natural surroundings, translating them into colorful flowers and greenery, or dried flowers and pampas grass.

Close-up of small yellow flowers and pampas grass in a vase.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Studio Manifesto (opened in a new window/tab)
Close-up of colourful flowers and pampas grass.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Eva Solo (opened in a new window/tab)

Shapes and textures

Sunny days are a key summer feature, so why not incorporate them into seasonal arrangements? Here’s where shadows come into play.
Choosing shapes with care and positioning the arrangement according to sunlight will draw beautiful silhouettes on the surfaces nearby; a changing artwork that will mark weather and time of day, bringing a clue of the outdoor conditions indoors.

Warm breezes are another summer staple, and gently curved arrangements are a way to reflect this particular weather condition as if those stems were swinging in the wind. And taking inspiration from the Japanese art of Ikebana, summer arrangements could be made more refreshing by leaving water exposed.

Leafy arrangement reflecting on the wall nearby.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: DforDesign
Palm leaf reflecting its shadow on a wall.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: De Hoog Ceramics (opened in a new window/tab)
Stem vase with a single flowered branch.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Nezhno Ceramics (opened in a new window/tab)

Sourcing locally

Before anything else, a biophilic arrangement aims at connecting indoor spaces with their local surroundings, strengthening the bond between people and nature.
The question then becomes: what does summer mean to the natural world around you? Answering this question is not always immediate, especially when living in urban environments. So why not take the occasion to visit the closest patch of spontaneous nature and discover what it hides?

As a plus, foraging locally (always with moderation and respect) is also a very sustainable way of putting together a seasonal arrangement with a strong sense of place!

Simple greenery strands in clear vases.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Greenwise (opened in a new window/tab)
Flowe arrangement with one single strand bended.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Hanakuma Ikebana (opened in a new window/tab)

 
 
Summer is a season that changes a lot according to the location; from bright mountain landscapes, to deep seaside views, to dry and hot environments. And something as simple as a flower arrangement can help bring that local uniqueness indoors!

Time to wrap this journey across seasons up.
In this series, we’ve seen how an apparently simple flower or greenery arrangement can in fact be a lot more than a decorative piece. It can be a souvenir of a pleasant moment spent outdoors, the occasion to discover local nature, a connection to seasonal weather features.
In short, a way to nurture the bond between humans and nature, that’s often buried under modern living standards.
This is what a biophilic arrangement is!

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