Biophilic design: 8 ideas for a budget-friendly garden wall

in Biophilic Design

Garden wall, vertical garden…however we want to call it, a wall full of greenery is one of the many uses of plants in interiors as well as one of the most requested biophilic design features!

Vertical garden systems can be pretty sophisticated though, with irrigation channels and heavy structures to be mounted on the wall. Definitely not a suitable solution for everyone.
But this doesn’t mean one can’t recreate the look and feel of a vertical garden in a more budget-friendly (and I’d add move-friendly) way!

Let’s then explore 8 alternative ideas to achieve a garden wall design!

Wood wall with greenery insets.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: MNDFL (opened in a new window/tab)

1. Moss walls

If you like the look, preserved moss panels (opened in a new window/tab) are a quick and easy solution to dress a wall in green.
Mixing different moss textures and hues can make the design more interesting. Also, moss can be fit into pre-shaped panels to create more graphic effects.

Wood wall with greenery insets.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Concept Vision (via Behance) (opened in a new window/tab)
Close-up of a black wooden wall with moss insets.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Abito verde (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)

2. Modular systems

There exist ready-made solutions that take the concept of big garden wall systems and scale it back. Being modular, they’re easy to adapt to any available space and reconfigure in case of moving.
The irrigation is also integrated into each module and, thanks to a passive built-in system, one round of irrigations lasts for several months!

Modular wall-mounted planters.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Bio360 (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)

3. Wall-hung planters

A long planter fixed to the wall (up close to the ceiling) and filled with draping plants is another quick solution to create a vertical garden.
Pothos and ivy plants are ideal as they grow quickly and in length. Therefore, they’ll create a long greenery drape that will soon reach the floor!

Pothos plant draping from ceiling to floor.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Jardinitis (opened in a new window/tab)

4. Crates

Similar to the above, wall-hung crates can also contain draping plants. The side of the crates will remain visible in this case – an extra occasion to tie your design scheme in.

Metal crates hung on the wall containing plants.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Vive Studio (opened in a new window/tab)

5. Shelves

Stand-alone or wall-mounted. Linear or in a different shape... Shelves bring in a wealth of options when it comes to displaying plants creatively!
This solution allows for achieving dense and lush designs similar to “regular” garden walls. Otherwise, the shelf itself can become part of the design.

For instance, in one of my latest projects, the hexagonal modules of a shelving unit act as a 3D artwork while displaying plants that are placed irregularly.

Biophilic design concept for a dining room with an hexagonal shelving unit displaying draping plants.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: DforDesign
Plants miniatures on 5 stacked shelves.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Astrid Wilk Studio (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)

6. Sparse garden walls

A garden wall design doesn’t necessarily have to be solid greenery.
Sparse and more graphic solutions can be just as impactful and may actually fit better depending on the space.
Some examples would be wall-mounted planters, hanging vases and baskets. Or even a propagation wall to turn planting experiments into a work of art!

Pots hung on a wall-mounted trellis.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Vintage Revivals (opened in a new window/tab)
Propagation wall made with wall mounted tubes.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Vintage Revivals (opened in a new window/tab)

7. One leaf-solutions

Whether it’s with pins and a string or framed, the concept here is filling the wall with single leaves.
Displaying single leaves may seem too little to achieve the aim of a garden wall, but I would argue the opposite.
This simple display calls attention to the details. Appreciating texture, colour and shape differences can become a sort of meditative exercise. And recognizing all the plant species may even become a game to play together!

Leaves hung on a wall with pins and a string.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: A Splendid Occasion (via In Honor of Design) (opened in a new window/tab)
Pressed leaves displayed on glass frames.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: El Mueble (opened in a new window/tab)

8. Green room dividers

Last but not least, green room dividers can be the solution whenever a wall-mounted design is not an option. Perfect to shield a “cozy corner” or a home office, they create the effect of a garden wall while being movable!

Room divider filled with air plants.<span class="sr-only"> (opened in a new window/tab)</span>
Credit: Tillandsia Michieli (via Instagram) (opened in a new window/tab)

 
All in all, garden wall designs are not as unattainable as they might seem!
I hope these ideas have convinced you not to shy away from them and inspired you to experiment in your space!

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